Madison Dentist Phone
First Choice Dental

facebookTwitterYoutube

When do you start dental care with kids?

“You got bright white teeth so take care of them, brush in the morning, and the night, and again and again. So put the toothpaste on your favorite brush. Be sure to take your time, don't ever rush!”

Your first dental visit can be scary—especially for infants, toddlers, and preschool aged children—with loud noises and new faces. But, as Deema from Bubble Guppies points out, even little kids need to take care of their teeth.

When do you start dental careThe American Dental Association recommends, and First Choice Dental agrees, that your child should see a dentist for his first dental visit within six months of the eruption of the first tooth, or before her first birthday.

At First Choice Dental, your child will never outgrow us—from first tooth to first grade and beyond. Before you assume your child’s dental visit will result in a full-blown tantrum, remember, he isn’t afraid of the dentist yet. Here’s what to expect at the first appointment:

  • This visit will be short and informal. For more than 12 years, we’ve provided families with comfort-conscious dental care.
  • One of our Madison-area dentists will check for decay, and look at your child’s gums, jaw, and bite while she sits in your lap. If your child has teeth, we may also clean them.
  • You’ll learn how to care for your child’s developing teeth and gums. Bring your questions for us on teething, thumb sucking, tooth-friendly foods, and more.
  • You’ll schedule your child’s next visit at one of our nine Madison-area locations. We offer family scheduling, which means we’ll see your whole family at once.
  • If your child needs specialty dental work, we offer over twenty types of dental care in-house.


Prepare your child for his dentist visit with these tips:

  • Brush twice a day. Brush your child’s teeth as soon as they erupt. Use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste on a soft, kid-sized brush.
  • Floss daily. Start flossing when your child has two teeth sitting next to each other. Usually, children under five will need your help.
  • Be a good role model. Show your kid how to brush and floss as part of your daily routine.
  • Read up. Pick out a book or television episode about visiting the dentist that you and your child can read or watch together.
  • Play pretend. Before the first dentist appointment, play dentist with your kid. Practice opening wide and counting teeth.